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city with all these events and at the same time we're creating jobs and we're making sure our economy is boosting at the same time. we've been very successful at creating conditions to make sure that our investors and our entrepreneurs in this city maintain their investor confidence, allowing them to innovate, to grow and to create jobs. and whether they are a neighborhood or a small business or an international clean tech company or new technology company, they've got investor confidence in our city. we're also creating investor confidence because we have in working closely with our controller and all the other financial organizations of our city and all of our departments, we're now on a more financially stable responsible path. we've done our pension reform, it's not 100 percent, we've gt a big chunk of it down and we're going to continue doing the smart things to make sure that pension is solid. and we've got structural reforms in our budget as well. we passed our first two-year budget. that's a wonderful accomplishment, one that i'm interested in to continue it make sure we
busters on our financial economy, stablization and financial ideas because that's what we have to do first, is have a good economic foundation in which to grow. for the first time in years you've seen a lot of unity move around this city between business and labor, between the laib and the board of supervisors. we've all come together to tax reform, on housing, on fixing our parks and open space. we've got this year coming together in unprecedented way to put these issues on the ballot before the voters and make sure it's the right time for all of us to be smart, to make long-term investments in housing and in parks and it is time to do tax reform. together we're putting people back to work, building our city at the same time and now the tax structure has to be addressed. a lot of people keep asking me, what is this tax reform? it's kind of complicated. and i tell them it's about real people, real businesses and real jobs. because it is now that we're the only city in the state of california that's got a payroll tax. we're still taxing job creation, opposite of what we've all wanted t
access in our economy rather than just offered ownership and to me, that's really what wha* the shared economy is about and this great incubating idea of scooter sharing is wonderfulfinger these are all electric, you can power this up on 18 cents worth of power as compared to what gasoline prices are. it takes, if you want to go around the city at 30 miles an hour, it will be less than half of the power of a toaster. it's equivalent to 850 miles a gallon to be on one of these electric scooters. i think it's safe, obviously we're going train people in the right way to abide but all the traffic regulations that we have, but as i sit in my car on days where i have to wait and 7, watch these scooters go by, it's kind of like where am i and what am i doing and can i contribute even more, so it's exciting to see this happen in san francisco, to see its launch, it's exciting that it's an idea that incubated out of the hub, it's exciting to not only see that it's fun for people to get around, to be more efficient and to kind of stralgts the lanes, but it's exciting to know it contributes so mu
the economy. and so there are a host of host of measures in each of those areas that are absolutely critical for our future and they are not easy decisions to be making but we have to make them sooner rather than later. because if you just pass the buck, it is the next generation who is going to be holding the bag. and in my mind, that is why i am running. it is really to look out for the children who are not voters, who are not being actually considered in my mind as much as they should. >> thank you. >> mr., chig how would you address the state's financial problems? >> we are about a hundred billion dollar budget here in california. we spent about a hundred billion and we bring in $80 billion revenue and that is a $20 billion budget gap, the fastest way for that is to grow jobs, we created clean, green collared jobs and brought jobs from overseas here into san francisco. she is are models that we can take to continue to grow our economy. unfortunately that is not going to be enough. we have to also look at ways to raise revenue, that is why i am in support of our governor's tax measure bec
to be, all those things that economies you as well as our own policies to entice growth. >> that implies to me this kind of hybrid, taking into account what we think will happen but also some direction because i know is that the projections were high in the santa clara county which actually is more auto centric, more spread out; it seems that would be counter intuitive considering senate bill 375. >> when you dig down to santa clara in general, oakland, san francisco san jose are taking on a substantial part of the growth. the region came up with a few scenarios and one is that they were all kind of anti-sprawl; some more center focus in others. most of the growth in santa clara will happen in san jose. also in the process we have been coordinating with the cities of oakland and san jose and a big transportation providers, we knew that the big three cities there is leadership in this process; if we were not okay with what was proposed, we have to make surethat we have a voice. a lot of this in san jose. >> unlike san francisco, in san jose most of the job centers are not within the dow
of the san francisco economy 80% of our economy is small business along our commercial corridors and most jobs are created by small businesses each year. the city needs to reorient its economic polices towards small businesses and start to remove the red tape and stream-lining the permitting process and other ways to facilitate small businesses to thrive and survive in san francisco. so my no. 1 priority is reorienting our economic polices away from the cronyism, the power elect elite and back to the small businesses. >> i was born and raised in the district. that is not why i think you should vote for me as your supervisor. my entire life was been committed to this district starting when i worked for the mayor where women were trained i know what good social services look like, but i understand that we can't exclude people because they are rich. we can't exclude people because they are middle-class at the expense of making sure we're taking care of one class of people. i worked really hard and there were a lot of people that helped me become the person who i am. sadly, my brother did n
of the economy in the area right now and light industrial, arts and recreation and the things that are making that a cool hot new area and we can accommodate that growth. we think this will be jobs for 400 to 500 people. one of the things to recognize this project is important to the port for quite a while. a decade ago we were in contract with other entities to do this and tried to make this project happen. we carry $109 million in the capital plan to do these buildings. we have a project before you today where the orden development group would take the lead and invest their funds and realize this. one of the reasons -- the high level reasons we think this can succeed at this point. one is we brought the capital costs down for a number of reasons and one is the specialized expertise in saving the buildings. this is a strong market interest. they have shown interest to the capital and put their equity on the table. one of the things the buildings will bring is historic tax credit and equity and low expense equity to the project and we have designed a participation rent structure where
lifestyles and making the planet safer, and in our increasingly accelerated economy where every minute counts, they don't want to be waiting around for someone to pick them up and circling for parking, they want an option that's faster and more affordable and more convenient and graenbacker greener and as we can see, our city's leadership feels the same way. we are today opening the world's first network of shared electric scooters that you can activate with your smart phone and your phone, it's not just a key to the scooters, it's really a key to the city, it brings everything in the city closer to you, it opens up new neighborhoods that you may not have gone to before and it makes the places you get to every day more fun to get to. for those of us who ride, life before scoot is sort of like life before mobile phones, once you have a short-cut to anywhere in the city in your pocket, you don't really want to go back, so we give you scoot, the world's first network of shared electric scooters and the perfect mode of transportation for the city that leads the world in what's coming next. thank
helping the economy but i can't tell you how many students said to me in different occasions i got to use what i learned in my math or science class or english class in the job that i got paid for this summer, so it is more that we can expect the curriculum to real world experiences that students understand are going to connect them to what they're going to do in the future i think the more engaging the curriculum becomes and the more we keep the students engaged and i am committing publicly we want the students involved and we want your feedback. >> about what about the simpler things and the resources? because a lot of students -- muni passes and students can't access the schools without getting on the back of the bus and maybe a chance of getting caught by the muni police? or the simple stuff like the libraries? and access to printers? what if there is not access at homes? what about the simpler things for students? >> great idea. you probably notice we're taking notes. i think they're great ideas and again we're going to be tapping your ideas about how do we really engage the au
of economy and jobs no longer exist. given the fact we have reducing industrial parcels, especially the site sfmta is looking at, we will have to look in other jurisdictions. that is less of an issue that we are looking at daly city then the question, what else is there. is this the only part, you know, large acre site. are there others we can look to purchase accept -- you know. are there other parcels that might cost us less. >> sure. let me turn this over to our brokerage, who knows very well the daly city market and san francisco market. >> hi. i'm james worth of colliers, san francisco. i will bring in randy keller. a couple things that came up in the notes. the building you are looking at leasing closed in july 2011, so it's been vacant over a year. the real estate market is in another planet from where it was in july 2011. that property is probably worth twice what they paid for it in the open marketplace, so that needs to be factored into your evaluations. the other thing supervisor campbell mentioned is you are stuck. you are not. you have a right to sublease. let's say you found so
of broader issues around the sharing economy, et cetera, you know, i think what i look forward to seeing legislation and i think this is a really, really hard issue. so i appreciate president chiu taking this on. and i think and i know that you know this, that it's important that we treat folks equitably. so i think it would be important that if we're going to allow, say, tenants to have certain ability to rent out when they are away for vacation, that we treat tenants and owners equitably and don't do something that favors someone because they are a tenant to be able to do something that a property owner can't do. i do see the [stk-eufrpgs/] between keeping units vacant, so that they are permanently hotelized, if that is a word. but i want to make sure that we're treating folks equitably. i also want to make sure that landlords should have some role here. so i know that i have heard is of some property owners who will see their building listed on air b & b, because a tenant is renting it out and they had no idea. and that is something that i think needs to be addressed. by the same tok
is that like this gap existed even when we were in flesh times when the economy was doing well and we had money and there was surplus, yet there still was this gap that still existed. and i know i actually -- this is the first time i met you. i'm a product of a public school. every bit of my education has been k through 12 has been through public school. so, i'm trying to figure out at what point -- what point do we start to lose this battle? that's why i asked for the longitudinal study the last ten years. it would be great if we could go even further back than that. i'm going to -- mr. arm entrout, i want to ask you to follow-up to get the answers to the questions that i propose here today. this last question really is -- i'm just looking for a better understanding, i've got? some concrete solutionses that the unified school district is going to be implementing to help combat these high drop-out rates. * i've heard some solutions today about t
is an institution that san francisco really counts on, i think, for both our economy and for all of the community, has been operating under duress for a number of years. we can and we will make the smart reforms, we already are making the smart reforms that need to be made around scheduling, around addressing the needs of our various communities and of our students and i think that's already well underway. we'll meet our accreditation and work to make the college more fiscally sound. but proposition a is really a component of that. it's not everything that needs to happen at san francisco city college right now, but it is a huge component and it will make a tremendous difference in ensuring that city college is here for san franciscoans in the future. >> thank you. is there any further response you have, starchild? >> every time we take more money from the taxpayers remember that's cutting into the budgets of families and individuals of san francisco who have to pay for their own education. outside city college they have to pay for housing and health care and food and other family needs, so
and our community of artists who struggle in this economy look to us to fund them. and when we go to the private foundation sector that they also go to, to ask for dollars, there's no way for them not to see it as competition because it is. so i think it's a delicate balance about how we look to public-private partnership. and i think there are unique ways in which we can fundraise and partner with the private sector to bring in new dollars that we wouldn't otherwise see in the arts ecosystem but we have to be cautious about how we go about that so we don't tap resources that are non-art programs. and as arts funding has decreased we want to be cautious that they see us as the grant-maker. they would love to see greater dollars coming to them through city funding. we want dollars that are in non-competition to our non-profit. so in the broader category of governance, some of the feedback in terms of the structure of the commission and now i've developed a biased of nine months, 10 months on the job i really feel this is a structure, this arts commission governance structure that b
in the scooter economy. and then we'll need to roll up our sleeves. we're going to need to get it done. i'm all about getting it done. i take these bold plans that were born out of our city's value and i'm going to make them happen. i can think of no better example of us working together, as judy mentioned earlier, than to bring about changes on central market. last april we passed a pay trowel tax exclusion to encourage twitter and other companies to take a second look at the neighborhood and i was just at one king's lane yesterday, which is one of the newer entities that moved into the what we call the twitter building now, and they are excited. you should meet and see these employees. they are excited to be on central market, they are talking about their families, the schools and what they want to do and just a year ago there was only less than 100 of them. today there are 300 and they expect to grow fabulously. look at what else we have accomplished today along central market. 8 technology companies have occupied, leased or purchased more than 800,000 square feet of space, representin
concerns about fiscal policy and housing policy. the so-called sharing economy has resulted in an internet-based market for short term rentals where owners or tenants lease to visitors and tourists. many rentals are currently illegal and the city's hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize some or all of these rentals and collect the hotel tax? we would like to hear answers from miss breed, miss johnson and mr. resignato. >> i definitely think this is a matter that the city should be looking into to collect that revenue. hotel tax revenue is extremely important especially in the arts. i run the african-american art and culture complex, a 34,000 square foot art space and we receive hotel tax revenue. the money we receive is not necessarily always enough in order to sustain the facility, which is why fundraising for that entity is so important. i think the abuses that we see here with some of these property owners should be definitely explored. but i also think that abuses around places like the filmore center, which is increasing rates for the current residents by 25-40% is just
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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